Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Miscreation - Debut Demo

Miscreation - Debut Demo
1999, Self Release

I heard of this band by reading through the reviews at the Eternal Frost webzine, and after digesting the glowing analysis found there contacted this Australian outfit to see if I could get a copy of their four-track CD. Lately I have really been in the mood to hear some good old brutal death metal - for whatever reason, maybe it's just the diet of boring copycat black metal bands that I've been fed for the last few years. So like many of my contemporaries I am either turning to my record collection, pulling out the masterpieces of the genre - all the albums that brought me into the scene in the first place - or I seek out new bands that embrace the same spirit of nihilistic grinding abandon. Miscreation are just such a band, and this excellent CD arrived at the perfect time to bless my jaded ears with eviscerating bliss.

Taking cues from Suffocation (I hear 'Breeding the Spawn' all over these songs - did you expect anything different?), Pyrexia, and bands of that ilk (Dying Fetus, Deeds of Flesh, old Cryptopsy, and too many countless others to name here) Miscreation have created an extremely lethal, cold, and pulverizing atmosphere on this disc - a disemboweling blender of a jagged guitar sound, scraping rusty knives on bone, a reaping steel machine gun for a drum set, battering you into bloody submission, and vocals that are like some huge dying beast being dragged along the pavement. Could it get more extreme? I don't know. With multiple stop-and-start elements in each song segment, riffs that endlessly chomp, tear, and circle about your head like starved vultures, buzzing, clawing, and screaming in ragged agony, an inhumanly warped sense of melody, song structures that are utterly bewildering to say the least, and titles like 'Cathedral of Vomit', you know where this band will stand when it comes to being slapped into a subgenre. I don't pretend to presume, however, and so I will let you decide for yourself: the guitars are original and well-played, sufficiently enough to warrant many listenings on their merit alone. Minor chord permutations are twisted, spun into variations, tweaked into higher harmonics, and then rabidly pounded back into line - this is where the Suffocation influence comes in. So be it. In the wake of that band leaving the death metal scene, and the enormous hole they left behind, it is only natural that many bands will be fighting to fill their place. I think that Miscreation, with a great deal of concentration on song-writing and an ability to incorporate novel influences or new sounds, will be high in the running. It's rare to see this kind of professional intensity in the underground, especially these days. This demo is highly recommended for those of you are hungry for something new - or rather, something older that has become relevant again.